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Saturday, August 1, 2020 | History

1 edition of Kant"s treatment of the arguments of God found in the catalog.

Kant"s treatment of the arguments of God

by Albert Georg Wiederhold

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Thesis (M.A.)--Boston University, 1936.

The Physical Object
Paginationv, 88 pages
Number of Pages88
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25944235M
OCLC/WorldCa7941186

  Therefore, God must exist both in conception and in reality. Therefore: God exists. 3. The Ontological Argument is remarkable in that it reasons from premises containing only definitions and logical laws to perhaps the grandest philosophical conclusion there is. We can know that God exists merely by reflecting on the concept of :// /06/30/the-ontological-argument-for-the-existence-of-god.   All strictly utilitarian arguments are consequentialist, but not all consequentialist arguments are strictly utilitarian. The important point is that one needn’t believe that utilitarianism is the correct moral theory in order to believe that consequentist arguments of either the strictly utilitarian kind or other kinds provide good ://~dscoccia/web/

2 days ago  Immanuel Kant, German philosopher who was one of the foremost thinkers of the Enlightenment and who inaugurated a new era of philosophical thought. His comprehensive and systematic work in epistemology, ethics, and aesthetics greatly influenced all subsequent philosophy. Learn more about Kant’s life and ://   Critique of Pure Reason, Pt. II., Div. ii., Book 2, c. iii., § 7 (Meiklejohn's trans., p. ).. Cf. J. Ward, Realm of Ends (). "Can we then prove the existence of God? Attempts innumerable to prove this have been made -- as of course we know -- all of them reducible to one or other of the three forms called respectively the ontological, the cosmological and the teleological ://~maritain/jmc/etext/pnthtm.

Scottish philosopher and empiricist David Hume argued that nothing can be proven to exist using only a priori reasoning. In his Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion, the character Cleanthes proposes a criticism: there is an evident absurdity in pretending to demonstrate a matter of fact, or to prove it by any arguments a g is demonstrable, unless the contrary implies a Kant: How is a Synthetic A Priori Judgment Possible? This rather obtuse question stands at the intellectual boundary between the early modern and modern ://@rgrydns/kant-how-is-a-synthetic-a-priori-judgment-possibleaf.


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Kant"s treatment of the arguments of God by Albert Georg Wiederhold Download PDF EPUB FB2

(This summary was produced for my classes) Kant’s Moral Argument for the Existence of God ©Peter Sjöstedt-H – Immanuel Kant () – the ‘Godfather’ of modern philosophy – is generally revered for his three critical books: The Critique of Pure Reason (1 st), The Critique of Practical Reason (2 nd), and the Critique of Judgement (3 rd) After reviewing Kant’s well-known criticisms of the traditional proofs of God’s existence and his preferred moral argument, this paper presents a detailed analysis of a densely-packed theistic argument in Religion within the Bounds of Bare :// Check out this great listen on This audiobook offers a clear and concise exposition and critique of Kant's arguments for God's existence.

© Kant’s Critique of the Traditional Arguments for the Existence of God This is a summary of the presentation given on the 4th of July. Unfortunately we were not able to video record the meeting.

However, there were power point slides (see Kants Critique). 1 Kant for Dummies When I was a young engineer, a senior [ ] This A Level RE lesson uses a free downloadable clip from Arguments For The Existence of God published by Oxford University Press.

It is designed to support teaching of the following modules in the new exam specifications: AQA: Component 1 (Section B) EDEXCEL: Paper 1 () OCR: Philosophy of Religion Paper 1 (Section B) WJEC: Component An illustration of an open book.

Books. An illustration of two cells of a film strip. Video. An illustration of an audio speaker. Audio. An illustration of a " floppy disk. Software. An illustration of two photographs. Full text of "Kants Conception Of God"   On Kant’s view, God would be a perfectly rational being (i.e.

has a “divine will”) and is therefore perfectly moral. The groundwork for the metaphysics of morals is not God–and there is an entire book of Kant’s that makes great efforts to explain the actual :// Similar to the subjective arguments for the existence of God, subjective arguments against the supernatural mainly rely on the testimony or experience of witnesses, or the propositions of a revealed religion in general.

The witness argument gives credibility to personal witnesses, contemporary and from the past, who disbelieve or strongly doubt the existence of :// /arguments-against-the-existence-of-god-overview.

Immanuel Kant criticised what he first termed the Ontological Argument at the beginning of his Critique of Pure Reason (). Focussing on the argument as presented by Rene Descartes, which suggested that existence is a perfection and thus a necessary attribute of God, who is a supremely perfect being, in the way that having three sides is a necessary property of a triangle or having valleys   12 Cosmological arguments claim God is the explanation of a causal universe (i.e., a universe that could not have caused itself).

13 Teleological arguments point to evidence of design in the universe as indicators of God’s existence. 14 Ontological arguments claim the very concept of God supports the necessity of His ://   by Matt Slick 12/09/ This is an attempt to demonstrate the existence of God using the Laws of Logic, also referred to as Logical Absolutes.1 The oversimplified argument, which is expanded in outline form below, goes as follows: Logical absolutes exist.

Logical absolutes are conceptual by nature--are not dependent on space, time, physical properties, or human :// God must exist in order to be a fair judge to bring us to the afterlife or not. This is why Kant is referred to in discussions about the Moral Argument for the Existence of God.

Strengths of Kantian Ethics. It is universal so everyone is treated equally and given equal ://   Immanuel Kant () is generally considered to be one of the most profound and original philosophers who ever lived.

He is equally well known for his metaphysics–the subject of his "Critique of Pure Reason"—and for the moral philosophy set out in his "Groundwork to the Metaphysics of Morals" and "Critique of Practical Reason" (although "Groundwork" is the far easier of the two to God is required for the goal of the 'summum bonum' to be realised but morality is not invalid if God's existence is denied.

He also doesn't believe that he has definitively proved the existence of God - he just thinks that our sense of right and wrong are the best indicators of :// God is therefore a postulate of our actual moral experience, our guarantee that the summum bonum will be realized.

However, as this reward for happiness clearly does not happen in this life, it must be attained in an afterlife (Kant's third postulate) where virtue will finally be rewarded with :// Patrick Glynn, in his book God: The Evidence, writes that everything had to be "'just right' from the very start—everything from the values of fundamental forces like electromagnetism and gravity, to the relative masses of the various subatomic particles, to things like the number of neutrino types at time 1 second, which the universe has to   This book is the newest installment in the Cambridge Critical Guides series, which aims to "serv[e] the twin tasks of introduction and exploration" (1).

Its fourteen chapters skew towards the latter task; they present cutting-edge research by scholars at various stages of their careers on some central themes and arguments of the first ://   arguments for God and immortality that Kant advances in the Critique of Practical Reason are supposed to bridge a “great gulf” (CJ 14, 36) between Kant’s accounts of the natural world and of human freedom.

If no bridge can be built, Kant is committed to a spectacular but wholly implausible metaphysical position that   From a general summary to chapter summaries to explanations of famous quotes, the SparkNotes Immanuel Kant (–) Study Guide has The traditional arguments are in fact necessary to establish the existence of God as a transcendental conclusion.

And there is no reason to assume, as Van Til does, that anyone who uses an argument from design or causality is presupposing a nontheistic ://. Kant thought that metaphysical claims about the supersensible realm (e.g., the world as a whole, the human soul, and God) were subject to Pyrrhonian equipollence: equally strong arguments could be given for and against such claims, leading the metaphysician to suspend judgementregarding the claims.

The Antinomies of Pure Reason were Kant's Perhaps the strongest argument against the philosophy of Immanuel Kant () was given by his immediate follower, Johann Fichte (), and by his immediate followers. For Fichte, Kant’s weakness was his doctrine of the Unknowable Thing-in-itself   Kant: The Moral Order Having mastered epistemology and metaphysics, Kant believed that a rigorous application of the same methods of reasoning would yield an equal success in dealing with the problems of moral philosophy.

Thus, in the Kritik der practischen Vernunft (Critique of Practical Reason) (), he proposed a "Table of the Categories of Freedom in Relation to the Concepts of Good and